Agreement Phone Contract

They may be impressed by the hours spent writing this elegant “legal briefing” to convince you why they`re mature enough for a smartphone, but don`t be fooled. IQ has nothing to do with the essentials needed to use the smartphone: maturity, impulse control, and the ability to resist temptations and manage risk, to name a few. At the end of the day, our children are good people we love and trust (well, most of the time). What we need to do is allow our children to make good decisions with this new gadget – to help them understand that a mobile phone, like all privileges, is a responsibility. Melanie and her husband Chris are raising four children in a media-balanced home — and have managed to replace video games with sports, music, art and good manners, and they`ve also done the impossible: they`ve prevented social media and smartphones from controlling their teens. For more information about recovering your kids and re-connecting your family, see www.FamiliesManagingMedia.com. Set up enforceable rules (with obvious consequences) as soon as they receive a phone. Just write down the rules and smile as you give them to your teen. Explain that this is a new day. Let them express with respect and thank them for sharing some of their budding wisdom. Don`t argue with them, be happy and confident. Once completed (a trial of less than 30 minutes, since there will be no dispute), do not sign anything; Instead, do something funny with your family (excursion, bike ride, hike or dinner – without a phone, of course!). The goal is to set and model healthy boundaries and priorities and not let the discussion about the “phone rule” take over all the power and ruin your day or relationship.

This approach will help keep the phone in its place in your family, at the bottom of the tota. The other goal is to give them a glimpse of real life: as adults, they still have to play by the rules and show responsibility, transparency and balance. You say they don`t like rules? They are not ready for a phone. .